Step 1. Scan a tag

The first step in the life of a Repairtagger ticket is to scan a tag number to create a new ticket. When you scan a tag number that is not yet in use, a new ticket is automatically created. If a tag number is already in use on a ticket, the app will open the existing ticket.

If you are wondering where this tag number is supposed to come from, check out the Physical Tag Options. Repairtagger uses physical tags with a tag number to connect the item to be repaired to the ticket in the app.

Have a tag ready?

How to scan a tag

There are three tabs at the top of the scan page:

Camera Icon

../_images/qr-camera-tab.png

This tab is where you can scan QR codes.

Scanning QR Codes

  1. Tap on the camera icon tab at the top of the page
  2. Position the camera over the QR code.

You will see a ‘Loading Tag’ message when the QR code has been read. If the tag number is in use, you will be taken to the existing ticket, otherwise a new ticket will be created.

../_images/scanning-qr-code.jpeg

Keyboard Icon

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In this tab, tag numbers can be scanned in two ways:

Scanning Using a Bluetooth Scanner

Scanning by typing in a number

Scanning Using a Bluetooth Scanner

  1. Tap on the keyboard icon tab at the top of the page
  2. Scan the barcode or qr code.
  3. The tag number will appear in the tag number field.
  4. Tap ‘Load’

You will see a ‘Loading Tag’ message. If the tag number is in use, you will be taken to the existing ticket, otherwise a new ticket will be created.

Scanning by typing in a number

  1. Tap on the keyboard icon tab at the top of the page
  2. Type the tag number into the tag number field.
  3. Tap ‘Load’

You will see a ‘Loading Tag’ message. If the tag number is in use, you will be taken to the existing ticket, otherwise a new ticket will be created.

../_images/type-number-manually.png

Tag Icon

../_images/qr-ocr-tab.png

This tab allows scanning tag numbers using text recognition.

Scanning using Text Recognition

  1. Tap on the tag icon tab at the top of the page
  2. Position the lit box over the tag number.
  3. Hold it there until a button appears beneath the camera window with the tag number on it.
  4. Tap on the button. You will see a ‘Loading Tag’ message. If this tag number is in use on a ticket, you will be taken to the ticket. If it is not in use, a new ticket will be created.

Note

If there is more than one number in the scanning window, a button will be shown for each number. Simply tap on the one that you wish to use.

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Helpful hints for scanning numbers

Text recognition is a pretty cool technology, but it is not perfect! Some numbers will scan better than others, and there are some limitations in the technology in general. Here are some examples of what will scan well, what scan less well, and some numbers that just aren’t going to scan no matter how much you wiggle your device around.

Numbers that will scan well

Numbers that are clearly printed, without nearby text, will scan very well. There are a few exceptions to the rule about nearby text. They are:

no.

tag #.

tag #

#

number.

number

tag no.

tag no

Here are some examples of tags that are perfectly suited to this application:

../_images/good-tag1.png ../_images/good-tag2.png ../_images/good-tag3.png

Handwritten Numbers

It is even possible to scan handwritten numbers, if they are carefully written, and well spaced. Here are a few examples of handwritten numbers that scan well:

../_images/good-tag4.jpg ../_images/good-tag5.jpg

Numbers that will not scan as well

Numbers that have a lot of closely surrounding text, a strange font, or are widely spaced will be harder to scan.

Here are some examples of tags that should still scan, but not as well:

../_images/ok-tag1.png ../_images/ok-tag2.png

Numbers that probably are not going to scan

Handwritten numbers that are messy and close together are probably not going to scan well, if at all.

Here is an example of a number that will not scan:

../_images/bad-tag1.jpg